A Brief (brief) Glimpse of Amsterdam

Taking a short break from the warm weather of New Orleans, I spent the last four months studying abroad in Amsterdam, which has always been one of my favorite cities. Though I had been there before, I was excited to experience the city again, from a more comfortable position, knowing that I could take my time getting to know the narrow streets. At the same time, I also found myself with more time on my hands and an eagerness to fill that time with something exciting.

I’ve always loved taking photos as a way of remembering the places I’ve been and wanted to look at my surroundings through a more detailed lens. I purchased a cheap second-hand film camera to alleviate the costs I’ve incurred buying disposable cameras, and started taking more photos throughout my day and on other trips I went on during the semester.

Here are some of those photos to try and showcase what I’ve been up to the past four months, all taken on one of two film cameras I purchased this semester (an Olympus Trip 35 and a Fujifilm Clearshot 20 Auto). Though this is a blog, meant for words and lengthy descriptions, pictures seemed like the most authentic way to give an accurate depiction of the wonderful places I was lucky enough to find myself in this semester.

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The Travels Continue! (Belgrade, Budapest, Vienna)

(Disclaimer: This travel update was a bit lengthier than I intended. I really just wanted to tell everyone about the pure magic that is St. Gilgen, but felt I had to move in chronological order for the sake of my avid readership and of course – accuracy. Read as you may, but feel free to skip to the end and just read about St. Gilgen)

To share every story of every city and country would be a daunting task, if not an impossible task. Even sharing brief glimpses into our journey is intimidating at times. Am I telling the right stories? Am I casting the right light? After recapping the first two weeks of my trip, the Greek adventures, I’ve been a little quiet, not really knowing where to pick up again.

Quiet because after leaving Greece, there was so much to explore and too much to see that we’ve spent very little time stagnant. Walking everywhere, we’ve been constantly moving. Learning new cities rather quickly, walking, has proven to be a pragmatic and cost-effective way to understand our new surroundings. 10-mile days leave your legs aching and your eyes satisfied, and we’ve been aching and satisfied for a while now.

We spent our first few days in Belgrade and were pleasantly surprised by its charm. The Kalemegdan was our favorite site, an expansive park and Belgrade’s old fortress punctuated by the junction of the Danube and Sava rivers.

Church in the Kalemegdan

Saying goodbye to Belgrade we took an overnight train to Budapest. Arriving early in the morning, we set off for another long day of walking and sightseeing. Budapest was lovely, with beautiful architecture and culture. We made a stop at the iconic baths, although we were a bit perplexed at first. The Széchenyi Thermal Baths which opened in 1913 (much later than I would’ve thought) are the largest spa baths in all of Europe and draws large crowds to bathe in its supposedly medicinal water. I’m not sure how medicinal the water is in 2018, but it’s definitely worth checking out. Make sure you save some energy for the wild nightlife that Budapest has to offer. Ruins bars, party boats down the Danube and nightclubs all await you in Budapest!

Széchenyi Baths

From Budapest we took a short train ride for some relaxation in Vienna. We spent a few days there, taking in the stunning palaces and museums all teeming with interesting things both on the inside and the outside. The Museum Quarter in Vienna can have your mind occupied for hours, and the Schönbrunn Palace will give you all the information on the Hapsburg empire you could ever need. Vienna is also surprisingly a vegan’s heaven with one of their most common bakery chains (Anker) featuring dozens of vegan treats. Their apple strudel is worth the trip alone!

But after uninterrupted days of exploring city after city, we needed to some real rest and relaxation. We needed to get back to the mountains, have some green space around us. With Salzburg next on our itinerary, we decided to stay a little bit more removed from the city.

About 15 miles outside of Salzburg was the picturesque, perfect Austrian town of St. Gilgen. I wish I could accurately describe its immediate, irresistible charm, but I can only try. Right after getting off the bus (that we somehow rode for free) we dropped our bags, changed into bathing suits and walked not 300 meters to the most beautiful lake I’d ever seen – Lake Wolfgang. Situated in-between towering green mountains was the beautiful turquoise water, glimmering for us, inviting us to jump in.

Lake Wolfgang

Lake Wolfgang

Early the next morning we picked up a map of hiking trails and selected one that seemed up our alley – not too long in both distance and time. We hiked about 4,000 feet up one of the mountains. It was long stretches of steep uphill followed by even longer stretches of more mild, but more meandering uphill.

The whole hike was surreal – expansive greenery with the occasional view of the turquoise water poking through at certain bends and points on the trail. We got to the first end point, where the cable car lets off, and continued up a little longer before finding our ideal, secluded spot to lay amongst the bugs and wildflowers and bask in the golden sun heating up the meadow.

Our Perfect Meadow

We only had a little more than 24 hours to enjoy the beauty of St. Gilgen but we definitely stretched those 24 hours as far as we could. If you ever find yourself in Austria and have a few days to spare, you would be remiss to not visit St. Gilgen. Take our word for it! The magical hills and magnificent lake will be waiting for you! They’ll be waiting for me till I return.

Summer Travels!

As I write this post, I am sitting in a little train car on my way from Athens, Greece to Thessaloniki, a city further north. Not originally on our itinerary, we chose to make a one-night stop in this new city as a buffer on our twisted journey to Belgrade, Serbia. A train to Thessaloniki, and two busses between Macedonia and Serbia will do the trick – though more convoluted than our original intention of a singular night train from Athens to Belgrade.

Athens had been kind of a whirlwind for Zac and me. We arrived early in the morning, around 10:00, and were ravenous for breakfast. We dropped our things at our hostel, nearby the main square, and then doubled back to find food. Santorini, as beautiful and farm fresh as it was had little in terms of vegan food (falafel and tomato croquettes) so I was eager to find a vegan-friendly restaurant being in a bustling city. We were quickly surprised and happy to settle on a place called “vegan nation” – aptly named and quite tasty. The much-anticipated experience would have been perfect had two young kids begging for money not approached our table; unbeknownst to either Zac or me, swiped my phone from the table in the process. After a few minutes when I looked down from my food and realized what had happened we spent a few minutes being angry, then twenty minutes traipsing around the 2-block radius of the restaurant in search of the phone-thieves before quickly giving up. We decided the best thing to do would be to cut our losses and just accept that I would need to get a new phone in Greece. We still have over a month of the trip ahead of us and to do that without a phone would’ve been challenging, so our first day in Athens was spent dealing with the aftermath of our breakfast gone awry. Of course we woke up early the next day to see the Acropolis, the Parthenon, the Roman Agora, the Theatre of Dionysos, and all of the other historic and ancient sites in Athens. We spent the rest of our time in Athens just enjoying the change of scenery, spending one day reading at a rooftop bar with a stunning view of the main square and the Parthenon.

Athens

Our few days in Athens marks the end of our two week stay in Santorini, a smaller Greek island south east of the mainland. Santorini is a beautiful little island famous to tourists and travelers for its facade of white and blue buildings along the island’s coast. We we’re able to stay in Santorini for two weeks through the worldwide organization of organic farming (WWOOF), a program allowing us to live and work on an organic farm in exchange for free accommodations. Our host farm was a quaint little place in between Karterados and Monolithos – two of santorini’s smaller villages. Nestled right on the water we woke up each morning to walk the four dogs – always accompanied by two strays – and then to help with whatever task needed to be completed until it got to be noon and it was far too hot to continue working outside.

With the rest of the afternoons at our disposal we often spent the first few hours of the days reading and relaxing on the beach until we’d make the trek, often by foot, to Fira. Fira is one of the main parts of Santorini with the famous Caldera adorned with traditional Greek restaurants, shops, and bars. Here you’ll find a beautiful view of the sunset along the cliff’s edge, however you have to stake out your spot lest you be standing behind a few rows of other travelers inching forward to see the sun’s glow cast over the city.

sunset in Fira!

When the walk to Fira became too exhausting at a little over an hour each way, we rented 4×4 motorbikes to help us get around the island. I must say if you visit Santorini I can’t recommend this method of travel enough. The island is small so the motorbikes make all of its corners accessible whereas both the bus system and renting a car present certain impediments to prime site seeing. With the 4×4 you can essentially park anywhere, and the hour walk to Fira diminishes to less than 10 minutes. We took the 4x4s all over: to Fira then to Oía, to Kamari, and to Akrotiri.

The drive from Fira to Oía is a beautiful coastal drive along a winding road. There’s also an 11km walking trail too if you want to really take in the ocean expanse. I took the bus to Oía once: for €1.60 I boarded a coach bus and was terrified for 45 minutes as the bus attempted to traverse the turns and curves of the narrow coastal drive, but if you want to see Oía for a bargain – the bus is not a bad option.

Oía, Santorini

Oía, Santorini

Oía, Santorini

The lighthouse, ruins, and red beach are all sights to see in Akrotiri and would have been inaccessible to us without the 4x4s and had some of the most beautiful views of the island.

Red Beach, Santorini

View at the lighthouse, Akrotiri

Kamari is another beach town on the island that has a lot to offer, including a close-up view of the big mountain that was always visible from our farm. There’s a promenade on the beach with restaurants that set up lounge chairs next to the water. The Main Street also turns into a pedestrian walkway at night making it the perfect place to take a stroll or eat a late dinner in the company of others.

Attempting to sum up almost three weeks in Greece in a short blogpost is a challenging task, yet I hope this gave you a small glimpse into my recent adventures! Onwards and upwards!

Longing for Another Adventure

Walking around the streets of a new city I always find my neck craned upwards, taking in the architecture and air around me. Completely enamored by the new landscapes and buildings of Paris this summer, I spent hours walking aimlessly taking it all in. This summer, I lived in the 14th arrondissement of Paris for four weeks, taking classes through a program with Tulane University. The 14th arrondissement is a little bit more removed from the center of Paris; nine stops on the 6 line of the metro to put things in perspective.

After my classes ended, my family joined me in Paris to continue my travels. We made a quick stop in beautiful Amsterdam before setting off for Portugal. We started in Porto, traveled through Lisbon to the Algarve Coast.

We stationed ourselves in Sagres, right on the tip of the southern coast, or as the Tallest Man on Earth puts it in his song that shares the same name, we “went to where the world did end”.

This collection of live photos and videos attempts to capture glimpses of my summer in Paris, Normandy, Brussels, Amsterdam, Porto, Lisbon, Sagres, Lagos, and moments along the way.

I hope watching it makes you want to get away and be in a new place as much as me.