A Vegan Food Diary: Amsterdam

Studying abroad in Amsterdam last semester, one of the things I was most looking forward to was exploring all of the vegan restaurants I knew were hiding throughout the city. I had been to Amsterdam before, and hit a few of the popular vegan sites such as the Vegan Junk Food Bar, which serving exactly what it sounds like is famous on Instagram for over-the-top burgers; and the Happy Pig, a Dutch pancake joint that serves long and rolled-up pancakes.

 

 

But living and eating in Amsterdam for four months is different than filling a weekend with outrageous vegan food. I was so impressed with all the vegan options all over the city, from tons of restaurants that are entirely vegan to most places offering at least a vegetarian option, and every establishment offering at least one alternative type of milk. My friends, none of them vegan, were also super into exploring the different options and came with me to all of these restaurants and enjoyed their meals, which any vegan traveling knows can sometimes be a problem.

Here are some of the best spots I’ve found over the last couple of months for vegan fare in Amsterdam!

If you’re looking for a cozy Sunday morning brunch, Mr. Stacks is a pancake restaurant with plenty of options for everyone in the group. At this restaurant, the items marked with an asterisk show that they are not vegan, which is a nice change of pace from the usual breakfast restaurant. I ordered the savory stack both times I dined here, which along with three fluffy pancakes came with pink beetroot hummus, avocado, and a side salad. My friends chose to satisfy their sweet tooth, one of them ordering cinnamon roll pancakes with “cream cheese” icing, and the other ordered the most decadent chocolate pancakes I had ever seen. I snagged a bite from both of them and they were obviously delicious.

 

 

Another go-to brunch restaurant for my friends and I was Coffee and Coconuts, a three-story coffee house and cafe with unique and comfortable seating and an inviting ambiance. The restaurant’s menu rotates, but they always have a vegan option on it. Last I went, I ordered an open face mushroom sandwich with an amazing pomegranate garnish and dressing, but I’ve since heard they’ve changed it for something new!

Amsterdam has a few vegan restaurants with a fun concept to them such as the Dutch Weed Burger Joint, where each menu item is infused with seaweed in some way, offering plant-based versions of the fast food items every vegan sometimes craves. I was intrigued at the idea of seaweed burgers and nuggets and convinced my family to come to try out this unique restaurant with me, and we were all extremely impressed with the options and the taste.

IMG_7398

If you’re traveling on a budget, there are a ton of accessible and affordable vegan options in Amsterdam. Some of the bigger fast food chains have vegan options. Dominos, Papa Johns, and New York pizza all serve vegan cheese upon request. If you’re looking for “fancier” pizza, Sugo Pizza is right across from the De Pijp metro station and has 3 different vegan slices, all loaded with a tasty mix of veggies.

Another place my friends and I frequented was Maoz, an entirely vegan fast-food chain serving falafel sandwiches with a complimentary salad bar with dozens of toppings, and delicious hot fries with a variety of sauces. Either for a casual lunch in between classes or a late night snack at the end of a night out Maoz, definitely gives you a great meal at a very reasonable price.

Food Hallen is a large indoor food court with a really inviting and communal environment, housing a variety of high-end food stands with an international focus. From sushi and poke to barbecue, to Mediterranean and Mexican cuisine, there are options for every type of palate and eater.

In Amsterdam, while I didn’t feel pressured to google vegan restaurants in advance – because so many places were naturally very accommodating and vegan options were always readily accessible – I did enjoy doing some research to discover some gems I may have otherwise missed! If you’re planning a trip to Amsterdam, or are someone who’s lived there and is looking for new options, I encourage you to try any and all of these restaurants! You’re in for a delicious and (sometimes) healthy treat.

 

 

A Brief (brief) Glimpse of Amsterdam

Taking a short break from the warm weather of New Orleans, I spent the last four months studying abroad in Amsterdam, which has always been one of my favorite cities. Though I had been there before, I was excited to experience the city again, from a more comfortable position, knowing that I could take my time getting to know the narrow streets. At the same time, I also found myself with more time on my hands and an eagerness to fill that time with something exciting.

I’ve always loved taking photos as a way of remembering the places I’ve been and wanted to look at my surroundings through a more detailed lens. I purchased a cheap second-hand film camera to alleviate the costs I’ve incurred buying disposable cameras, and started taking more photos throughout my day and on other trips I went on during the semester.

Here are some of those photos to try and showcase what I’ve been up to the past four months, all taken on one of two film cameras I purchased this semester (an Olympus Trip 35 and a Fujifilm Clearshot 20 Auto). Though this is a blog, meant for words and lengthy descriptions, pictures seemed like the most authentic way to give an accurate depiction of the wonderful places I was lucky enough to find myself in this semester.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Travels Continue! (Belgrade, Budapest, Vienna)

(Disclaimer: This travel update was a bit lengthier than I intended. I really just wanted to tell everyone about the pure magic that is St. Gilgen, but felt I had to move in chronological order for the sake of my avid readership and of course – accuracy. Read as you may, but feel free to skip to the end and just read about St. Gilgen)

To share every story of every city and country would be a daunting task, if not an impossible task. Even sharing brief glimpses into our journey is intimidating at times. Am I telling the right stories? Am I casting the right light? After recapping the first two weeks of my trip, the Greek adventures, I’ve been a little quiet, not really knowing where to pick up again.

Quiet because after leaving Greece, there was so much to explore and too much to see that we’ve spent very little time stagnant. Walking everywhere, we’ve been constantly moving. Learning new cities rather quickly, walking, has proven to be a pragmatic and cost-effective way to understand our new surroundings. 10-mile days leave your legs aching and your eyes satisfied, and we’ve been aching and satisfied for a while now.

We spent our first few days in Belgrade and were pleasantly surprised by its charm. The Kalemegdan was our favorite site, an expansive park and Belgrade’s old fortress punctuated by the junction of the Danube and Sava rivers.

Church in the Kalemegdan

Saying goodbye to Belgrade we took an overnight train to Budapest. Arriving early in the morning, we set off for another long day of walking and sightseeing. Budapest was lovely, with beautiful architecture and culture. We made a stop at the iconic baths, although we were a bit perplexed at first. The Széchenyi Thermal Baths which opened in 1913 (much later than I would’ve thought) are the largest spa baths in all of Europe and draws large crowds to bathe in its supposedly medicinal water. I’m not sure how medicinal the water is in 2018, but it’s definitely worth checking out. Make sure you save some energy for the wild nightlife that Budapest has to offer. Ruins bars, party boats down the Danube and nightclubs all await you in Budapest!

Széchenyi Baths

From Budapest we took a short train ride for some relaxation in Vienna. We spent a few days there, taking in the stunning palaces and museums all teeming with interesting things both on the inside and the outside. The Museum Quarter in Vienna can have your mind occupied for hours, and the Schönbrunn Palace will give you all the information on the Hapsburg empire you could ever need. Vienna is also surprisingly a vegan’s heaven with one of their most common bakery chains (Anker) featuring dozens of vegan treats. Their apple strudel is worth the trip alone!

But after uninterrupted days of exploring city after city, we needed to some real rest and relaxation. We needed to get back to the mountains, have some green space around us. With Salzburg next on our itinerary, we decided to stay a little bit more removed from the city.

About 15 miles outside of Salzburg was the picturesque, perfect Austrian town of St. Gilgen. I wish I could accurately describe its immediate, irresistible charm, but I can only try. Right after getting off the bus (that we somehow rode for free) we dropped our bags, changed into bathing suits and walked not 300 meters to the most beautiful lake I’d ever seen – Lake Wolfgang. Situated in-between towering green mountains was the beautiful turquoise water, glimmering for us, inviting us to jump in.

Lake Wolfgang

Lake Wolfgang

Early the next morning we picked up a map of hiking trails and selected one that seemed up our alley – not too long in both distance and time. We hiked about 4,000 feet up one of the mountains. It was long stretches of steep uphill followed by even longer stretches of more mild, but more meandering uphill.

The whole hike was surreal – expansive greenery with the occasional view of the turquoise water poking through at certain bends and points on the trail. We got to the first end point, where the cable car lets off, and continued up a little longer before finding our ideal, secluded spot to lay amongst the bugs and wildflowers and bask in the golden sun heating up the meadow.

Our Perfect Meadow

We only had a little more than 24 hours to enjoy the beauty of St. Gilgen but we definitely stretched those 24 hours as far as we could. If you ever find yourself in Austria and have a few days to spare, you would be remiss to not visit St. Gilgen. Take our word for it! The magical hills and magnificent lake will be waiting for you! They’ll be waiting for me till I return.

Summer Travels!

As I write this post, I am sitting in a little train car on my way from Athens, Greece to Thessaloniki, a city further north. Not originally on our itinerary, we chose to make a one-night stop in this new city as a buffer on our twisted journey to Belgrade, Serbia. A train to Thessaloniki, and two busses between Macedonia and Serbia will do the trick – though more convoluted than our original intention of a singular night train from Athens to Belgrade.

Athens had been kind of a whirlwind for Zac and me. We arrived early in the morning, around 10:00, and were ravenous for breakfast. We dropped our things at our hostel, nearby the main square, and then doubled back to find food. Santorini, as beautiful and farm fresh as it was had little in terms of vegan food (falafel and tomato croquettes) so I was eager to find a vegan-friendly restaurant being in a bustling city. We were quickly surprised and happy to settle on a place called “vegan nation” – aptly named and quite tasty. The much-anticipated experience would have been perfect had two young kids begging for money not approached our table; unbeknownst to either Zac or me, swiped my phone from the table in the process. After a few minutes when I looked down from my food and realized what had happened we spent a few minutes being angry, then twenty minutes traipsing around the 2-block radius of the restaurant in search of the phone-thieves before quickly giving up. We decided the best thing to do would be to cut our losses and just accept that I would need to get a new phone in Greece. We still have over a month of the trip ahead of us and to do that without a phone would’ve been challenging, so our first day in Athens was spent dealing with the aftermath of our breakfast gone awry. Of course we woke up early the next day to see the Acropolis, the Parthenon, the Roman Agora, the Theatre of Dionysos, and all of the other historic and ancient sites in Athens. We spent the rest of our time in Athens just enjoying the change of scenery, spending one day reading at a rooftop bar with a stunning view of the main square and the Parthenon.

Athens

Our few days in Athens marks the end of our two week stay in Santorini, a smaller Greek island south east of the mainland. Santorini is a beautiful little island famous to tourists and travelers for its facade of white and blue buildings along the island’s coast. We we’re able to stay in Santorini for two weeks through the worldwide organization of organic farming (WWOOF), a program allowing us to live and work on an organic farm in exchange for free accommodations. Our host farm was a quaint little place in between Karterados and Monolithos – two of santorini’s smaller villages. Nestled right on the water we woke up each morning to walk the four dogs – always accompanied by two strays – and then to help with whatever task needed to be completed until it got to be noon and it was far too hot to continue working outside.

With the rest of the afternoons at our disposal we often spent the first few hours of the days reading and relaxing on the beach until we’d make the trek, often by foot, to Fira. Fira is one of the main parts of Santorini with the famous Caldera adorned with traditional Greek restaurants, shops, and bars. Here you’ll find a beautiful view of the sunset along the cliff’s edge, however you have to stake out your spot lest you be standing behind a few rows of other travelers inching forward to see the sun’s glow cast over the city.

sunset in Fira!

When the walk to Fira became too exhausting at a little over an hour each way, we rented 4×4 motorbikes to help us get around the island. I must say if you visit Santorini I can’t recommend this method of travel enough. The island is small so the motorbikes make all of its corners accessible whereas both the bus system and renting a car present certain impediments to prime site seeing. With the 4×4 you can essentially park anywhere, and the hour walk to Fira diminishes to less than 10 minutes. We took the 4x4s all over: to Fira then to Oía, to Kamari, and to Akrotiri.

The drive from Fira to Oía is a beautiful coastal drive along a winding road. There’s also an 11km walking trail too if you want to really take in the ocean expanse. I took the bus to Oía once: for €1.60 I boarded a coach bus and was terrified for 45 minutes as the bus attempted to traverse the turns and curves of the narrow coastal drive, but if you want to see Oía for a bargain – the bus is not a bad option.

Oía, Santorini

Oía, Santorini

Oía, Santorini

The lighthouse, ruins, and red beach are all sights to see in Akrotiri and would have been inaccessible to us without the 4x4s and had some of the most beautiful views of the island.

Red Beach, Santorini

View at the lighthouse, Akrotiri

Kamari is another beach town on the island that has a lot to offer, including a close-up view of the big mountain that was always visible from our farm. There’s a promenade on the beach with restaurants that set up lounge chairs next to the water. The Main Street also turns into a pedestrian walkway at night making it the perfect place to take a stroll or eat a late dinner in the company of others.

Attempting to sum up almost three weeks in Greece in a short blogpost is a challenging task, yet I hope this gave you a small glimpse into my recent adventures! Onwards and upwards!

It’s Been a While!

Hey there! It’s been a while since I’ve checked in with the blogging world. Since spring semester picked up I’ve been juggling acquainting myself with new classes, easing back into the New Orleans lifestyle and social scene, and also trying to maintain a steady flow of writing; sometimes it’s more than I can manage. But in the meanwhile, I want to share some things with you all other than writing.

Photography has always been a humble passion of mine. Only taking an introductory course in digital photography last summer, did I even begin to scratch the surface on what could hopefully be a lifelong pursuit. Instructional and recreational photography in Paris and Europe offered abundant landscapes and architecture to capture, but it only made me more excited to return home with my new appreciation for simple beauty.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

New Orleans and it’s European and French influence make it just as picturesque. Traipsing through the French Quarter and the surrounding neighborhoods with a disposable camera have produced some of the best and memorable photos I’ve ever taken. I want to share a few of those photos with you all so you can bask in the light and charm that is this city.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Now you just have to pick up a cheap camera and go find things that excite you!

Big Easy Express

Thousands of miles of train track from Oakland to New Orleans covers some of America’s most scenic views, taking one through beautiful sights you’d all but miss on the more efficient plane ride. In 2012, three bands, folk-rock, indie, and bluegrass – Mumford and Sons, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, and Old Crow Medicine Show – rented a vintage train in California, creating the musical tour of dreams, playing shows along the way as they took the infamous train journey from Oakland to New Orleans covering four thousand miles.

The Big Easy Express is a cinematic music experience that combines a concert movie with a roadie documentary, bringing you in and behind the action of incredible music being made. The quality of the sound makes you feel as though you’re one of the spectators, tagging along at the train stops, dancing in the vibrant crowd at the shows and having a front row seat to their late-night jam sessions as the train speeds through the backcountry.

Baffled by the fact that such a movie could pay homage to New Orleans and I hadn’t yet seen it, a friend and I rented the movie and watched it two times through, and if you haven’t seen it I implore you to do so.

The three band’s sounds collaborate perfectly; in fact, you’d be hard-pressed to find three bands who so humbly and beautifully respect and enhance each other’s music in such an inspiring setting. There’s a fleeting scene where the Ed Sharp guys are singing “All Wash Out” in between train stops, and you begin to notice the crowd of musicians encircling the band is also strumming along, adding their notes and rhythms to the song.

At the concerts along the way, the bands take turns performing their own songs for crowds jumping with excitement and anticipation, but the finale of the show is worth watching even if you don’t consider yourself a fan of any of the three bands. Mumford and Sons, Old Crow Medicine Show, and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, take the stage together to cover Jonny Cash’s “This Train was Bound for Glory” which so perfectly captures the spirit and message behind the “tour of dreams” as the bands refer to it as. The energy on stage when the all of those talented people are together on stage is nothing short of magical – a symphony of country instruments all playing their hearts out.

Often you think of music as being the brainchild of one musician or at best an impressive feat of collective imagination, but sometimes it’s easy to forget how great music can come from anywhere. The closing scene of the film shows the bands sitting in a train car strumming a melody and brainstorming lyrics about the train experience. Seemingly out of nowhere the poignant lyrics come to fruition – “on a train to New Orleans, and all that country in between. Friends you and I, playing for our lives singing sweet dreams forever on a train in the sky.”

After watching the film, all I can say is how much I wish I was in New Orleans in the summer of 2012.

Halloween Over Midterms

14915683_10206353375147912_7857026706628855480_n
House on Saint Charles and State street

Usually, college students anticipate the ever-dreaded, bi-annual midterm week by staying in, studying, and getting rest. Unfortunately for me, my midterm exams have been strategically placed over three weeks, falling before and after our fall break. Finding the balance between school and social life for me has never been much of an issue, that is until I decided to continue my education in a place that is just begging you to go out and have fun.

Next week is Halloween, which of course for a lot of college students is an even more anticipated and exciting week than midterms. In New Orleans though, we do Halloween bigger and better than anywhere else.

Each year, Halloween in New Orleans, or Nolaween as I lovingly refer to it as, draws tons of visitors, students, and locals to the city, particularly Frenchman Street for one of the biggest Halloween parties in the country. The street is overrun by folks in costume, people selling food, and playing music, but the real excitement is in the bars that are gleaming with energy, music, and dance.

Bands stocked to the brim with horn and string instruments rock the night away while pirates, vampires, and cowboys drink and dance. The Blue Nile, and the Maison are personal favorites that never disappoint and always have a great band playing.

Halloween also draws one of New Orlean’s biggest music festivals to the city – Voodoo Fest. From October 27th-29th big artists like Kendrick Lamar, Post Malone, and The Killers will take the stage at City Park, and bring New Orleans a little extra Halloween charm.

A personal favorite band of mine, The Head and the Heart, will be wrapping up their fall tour at Voodoo Fest on Sunday. Their excitement and energy during their set will instantly put the band on your radar and make it a live performance you won’t want to miss and will definitely never forget.

These treats of the Halloween season are keeping all Tulane students motivated, myself included, until the weekend when we can relax and enjoy some wonderful music all while masquerading in costume.

22046050_10208552821692701_229305878879878946_n
Band Performing at The Blue Nile, September 19th